Let’s say that you have a start-up in an office space and the one thing everybody would require is the internet and lots of it. So, one has to provide them the tools for seamless, constant workflow, and a stable and robust internet connection is, by all means, a staple in the ever-growing corporate world, in IT, marketing, digitization, and such.

But to put up an A4 sized paper on the bulletin, where the network name and the password to the router are written, and one has to note it down and then sign in apathetically is just taxing. You could call a person lazy or a snob who would complain about the process, but you cannot blame them for doing it, for they are used to the privilege of everything handed out to them and for technology, which has made everything effortless.

But in a formal setting, to make things easier for the employees to gain access to the wifi, one can quickly put up a Quick Response code, which is the QR, and the name suggests what it does. People, with their smartphones and laptops, can quickly scan it with their cameras and voila, they will have access. But, you don’t necessarily have to do this at your home for your friends! Only if you were so generous.

I will share a quick and straightforward how to process, convert your wifi credentials into a QR code, and we will be on our way.

  1. Take a pen and note down your network name (SSID), encryption type, and the password, which is visibly written on your router or in the manual that came along with the package. The Wireless Encryption Key (WEP) will be available on your router too.
  2. There are websites purely devoted to the process which you can use for the conversion, such as qrstuff(.)com and qifi(.)com, which you need to use.
  3. Jot down your wifi credentials wherever necessary along with the encryption type and generate your QR code, which will be ready to print and to be shared.
  4. Display your code on a sheet and put it up wherever necessary, where people can easily see and access. In a formal setting, you might want to keep it somewhere only your employees can see and use it, for you don’t want visitors hoarding on your network.
  5. It depends on you if you want to give your employees a rundown on how it truly works. You can ask them to use their phone cameras to scan the code, for some have inbuilt scanners, or you can suggest apps that would help them do so.

One might think and reflect on the safety of such techniques, but it’s a way of making it more straightforward for people and not advocating a secure method of providing it. When it comes to malware, these websites and the process itself is safe.

The whole conversion erases the hassle of entering the password, and hence, the unencrypted password is linked to the QR code, making it so simple. And also, the whole QR code way of sharing the internet makes it a lot cooler, and efficient. And a stable source of the internet is significant at such times, and the approaches only get easier from here on.

Breanne Thorne

Author Bio: This article has been shared by Breanne Thorne who can usually be found binging on indie series on Netflix. Breanne loves dancing, cooks very badly, enjoys strolling around the city, and otherwise spends far too much time at the computer. She is residing in the USA, with her brother and adorable puppy, Milo.